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The last of the CH-46Es in Okinawa lands Sept. 30 on Camp Kinser for storage and disposition. The CH-46E Sea Knight, affectionately called “the Phrog,” has served with the Marine Corps and Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 since the Vietnam War. The VMM-262 “Flying Tigers” have used the CH-46 to participate in engagements such as Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq, Operation Unified Assistance in Southeast Asia, and, most recently, Operation Tomodachi in response to the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami. After serving faithfully for decades, the Phrog’s service has ended, paving the way for the MV-22B Osprey to take over. Aircraft “00” has a paint scheme unique to the “Flying Tigers” of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262. - The last of the CH-46Es in Okinawa lands Sept. 30 on Camp Kinser for storage and disposition. The CH-46E Sea Knight, affectionately called “the Phrog,” has served with the Marine Corps and Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 since the Vietnam War. The VMM-262 “Flying Tigers” have used the CH-46 to participate in engagements such as Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq, Operation Unified Assistance in Southeast Asia, and, most recently, Operation Tomodachi in response to the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami. After serving faithfully for decades, the Phrog’s service has ended, paving the way for the MV-22B Osprey to take over. Aircraft “00” has a paint scheme unique to the “Flying Tigers” of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262.

(From left to right) Master Chief Petty Officer David D. Jones, Petty Officer 1st Class Joseph S. De La Cruz, Brig. Gen. Steven R. Rudder and Petty Officer 1st Class Michael J. Pena pose Aug. 2 at Building 1 on Camp Foster following an awards ceremony. De La Cruz was presented the Independent Duty Corpsman of the Year award, and Pena received the Robert Graham Enlisted Award for his performance in support of the Naval Aerospace and Physiology Program. Rudder is the commanding general of the 1st Marine Air Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Jones is the command master chief with 1st MAW, III MEF. De La Cruz is an independent duty corpsman with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st MAW, III MEF, and Pena is an air medical safety corpsman with MAG-36, 1st MAW, III MEF. - (From left to right) Master Chief Petty Officer David D. Jones, Petty Officer 1st Class Joseph S. De La Cruz, Brig. Gen. Steven R. Rudder and Petty Officer 1st Class Michael J. Pena pose Aug. 2 at Building 1 on Camp Foster following an awards ceremony. De La Cruz was presented the Independent Duty Corpsman of the Year award, and Pena received the Robert Graham Enlisted Award for his performance in support of the Naval Aerospace and Physiology Program. Rudder is the commanding general of the 1st Marine Air Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Jones is the command master chief with 1st MAW, III MEF. De La Cruz is an independent duty corpsman with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st MAW, III MEF, and Pena is an air medical safety corpsman with MAG-36, 1st MAW, III MEF.

An MV-22B Osprey taxis behind a CH-46E Sea Knight Helicopter after its arrival at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma Aug. 3. Two Osprey aircraft, part of the second Osprey squadron to Japan, flew from MCAS Iwakuni. The arrival of the second Osprey squadron will complete the one-for-one replacement of the older CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters on Okinawa. The Osprey can fly twice as fast, carry three times the payload, and fly four times the distance of the older CH-46E. Its capabilities significantly benefit the U.S.-Japan alliance and strengthen III Marine Expeditionary Force’s ability to provide for the defense of Japan and perform humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions. The aircraft are part of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 262, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III MEF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew J. Manning/Released) - An MV-22B Osprey taxis behind a CH-46E Sea Knight Helicopter after its arrival at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma Aug. 3. Two Osprey aircraft, part of the second Osprey squadron to Japan, flew from MCAS Iwakuni. The arrival of the second Osprey squadron will complete the one-for-one replacement of the older CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters on Okinawa. The Osprey can fly twice as fast, carry three times the payload, and fly four times the distance of the older CH-46E. Its capabilities significantly benefit the U.S.-Japan alliance and strengthen III Marine Expeditionary Force’s ability to provide for the defense of Japan and perform humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions. The aircraft are part of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 262, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III MEF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew J. Manning/Released)

Marine Corps Installations Pacific